Development of a project design for a GEF Full-Size Project “A systemic approach to sustainable urbanization and resource efficiency in Greater Amman Municipality (GAM)”

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

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Background
 

A rapid increase in economic activity, population growth and successive influxes of refugees over the last decade have imposed huge stresses on Jordan’s urban areas and fragile water and energy resources. Sitting at the crossroads of two major areas of instability and prolonged conflicts, Jordan was originally a prime destination for several waves of forced migrants from Palestine – the majority of whom were granted Jordanian citizenship – and, more recently, from Syria, Lebanon and Iraq. With the conflict in Syria entering its fifth year, Jordan is now hosting 1.4 million Syrians, of whom 646,700 are refugees. Approximately 85% of these refugees, 550,000 in total, are living in non-camp settings in urban and rural areas. The highest concentrations are in northern and central Jordan, including the capital city, Amman, with the largest proportion (28%). Providing for the needs of Syrian refugees has impacted heavily on the Greater Amman Municipality’s public finances, increasing expenditures on subsidies and public services, and further degrading the built environment. For example, beyond targeted programmes (via direct budget assistance) to assist refugees and vulnerable households in host communities, the Jordanian Government estimates that, in 2015, it will incur additional subsidies on food, gas, water and electricity for refugees amounting to US$ 418 million and accelerated infrastructure depreciation totaling US$ 244 million (Jordan Response Plan – JRP – for the Syrian Crisis, United Nations and Government of Jordan, 2015).

At a city level, the Greater Amman Municipality (GAM) developed the Amman Master Plan (AMP) in 2010, which provides an overall vision for the growth of the city until 2025 with a clear overarching focus on climate-resilient development, the creation of green jobs, and a strive for resource efficiency in all aspects of municipal planning and investments. The AMP is reflective of a city and a country with limited indigenous energy and water resources and one that is heavily dependent on imports of energy to meet growing demand, expected to double by 2020. Jordan imports 96% of its oil and gas – accounting for almost 20% of the country’s GDP – which makes the country completely reliant on, and vulnerable to, the global energy market. Meanwhile the Kingdom is ranked third among the 18 countries in the world considered to be at risk of water insecurity. Municipal water use (including in the GAM) is currently met primarily using groundwater sources. In most urban sites in Jordan, water is supplied on an intermittent, rationed basis that requires household storage in cisterns and/or roof tanks. The JRP further notes that “Delivery frequency is insufficient and has worsened as a result of the increased demand and households have to supplement their supply by purchasing water. The influx of Syrian refugees has also increased pressure on already limited sewage and communal waste systems, which only cover 62% of the Jordanian population.”

Meanwhile Jordan’s National Energy Efficiency Action Plan (NEEAP), endorsed in 2013, sets a national energy efficiency (EE) target of a 20% reduction across all sectors by 2020 and proposes concrete measures in cities to guide Jordan towards achieving this target. The investment needed to reach this target is estimated at approximately US$ 152 million. On a positive note, Jordan now ranks second after Tunisia in the region in creating a favourable environment for energy efficiency investments, and Jordan’s initial accomplishments in the energy sector during the past two years include implementation of a subsidy removal plan and increase in tariffs; adoption of its first national energy efficiency action plan; and formulation of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for household appliances (the last achievement was due in large part to the GEF-funded Energy Efficiency Standards and Labelling in Jordan Project – UNDP PIMS # 3735).

A new UNDP-GEF Project Identification Form “A systemic approach to sustainable urbanization and resource efficiency in Greater Amman Municipality (GAM)” has been approved to assist GAM to systematically decarbonize its urban architecture, meet the NEEAP energy efficiency targets, conserve water and help authorities cope with the additional financial obligations and income losses resulting from providing energy services to the GAM’s refugee influx from the Syria crisis. The proposed project objective is to “assist the Greater Amman Municipality (GAM) improve the quality of life for its citizens and comply with the National Energy Efficiency Action Plan (NEEAP) via support for more sustainable resource-efficient urban planning and targeted low-carbon interventions in the municipal buildings and street lighting sub-sectors.”

The proposed project will assist the GAM achieve a more climate-resilient and low-carbon pathway via customized, targeted interventions and policy reforms in the municipal buildings and street lighting sectors, as well as provide more general support for the application of low-carbon planning and performance tools building off the existing Amman Master Plan and informed by the types of common tools promoted by GEFSEC under the Sustainable Cities IAP. Jordan’s building sector has been identified as having the second-largest potential for energy efficiency (EE) interventions in the country after the transport sector, accounting for approximately 35% of total final energy consumption, and as such is the main focus of this project.

This project includes four interrelated components linked by a spatial focus on the Greater Amman Municipality (GAM) that taken together are designed to help stakeholders in the GAM comply with the National Energy Efficiency Action Plan (NEEAP) while operationalizing the low-carbon principles contained in the Amman Master Plan (AMP) into a bonafide city-wide climate action plan. The four components are as follows:

Component 1: Urban sustainability planning tools and benchmarks

Component 2: Strengthened GAM enabling framework for low-carbon buildings and street lighting

Component 3: Performance-based GHG monitoring frameworks for low-carbon building and streetlights

Component 4: Targeted proof-of-concept mitigation interventions

 
Duties and Responsibilities

A Project Preparation Grant (PPG) has been approved by the GEF Secretariat to prepare a Full-Sized Project Document for submission. The process will equally take into consideration the comments received from the GEF Secretariat in the final PIF review sheet and those of all other relevant stakeholder for the project. The documentation to be produced must contain explicit explanations on how those comments were addressed in project design.

The PPG will allow for the recruitment of 2 local consultants and 1 international consultant to work on the Request for CEO endorsement and a complete UNDP Project Document (PRODOC) using the appropriate templates, including required letters of co-financing and all relevant annexes. These documents will be prepared under the guidance of the relevant UNDP/GEF Regional Technical Advisor and the UNDP Jordan’s Environment and Energy Team, working in close collaboration with key government officials, donors, NGOs, CBOs, and the private sector.

The PPG phase is expected to be completed within a period of 12 months. The Request for GEF CEO Endorsement and the UNDP Project Document (together with all annexes and supporting documentation) will therefore be submitted and approved no later than 30 July 2017. Therefore the key deliverables for submission are expected to be ready by March 2017. It is very important to respect the deadline, which takes into account the period for internal UNDP clearances and government validation before final submission to GEF.

The initiation plan will focus on undertaking studies to develop a detailed situational analysis as well as performance indicators for a full sized project. This will be done through wide and inclusive consultations so that the stakeholder’s views and concerns are addressed. The initiation plan will be in line with the outputs and activities outlined in the PIF. The final output of the initiation plan will be a UNDP-GEF project document and GEF CEO Endorsement template ready for submission to UNDP and the GEF. The main project preparatory activities for the PPG phase are outlined below.

Project preparation activities: 

Component A: Technical review and the baseline studies

The following specific data collection and analytical tasks are expected to be performed during the PPG phase:

  • The development of comprehensive responses and design modifications in the project proposal submission to address all issues identified in the GEFSEC PIF review.
  • The development of comprehensive responses and design modifications in the project proposal submission to address all issues identified in the GEF STAP (Scientific and Technical screening of the Project Identification Form) review; the STAP review will be provided to the consultants.
  • A comprehensive response to any opportunities/risks identified during a social environmental screening of the project proposal (SESP) at PIF stage; the SESP will be provided to the consultants.
  • A comprehensive analysis of how this project’s design and activities will coordinate and benefit from the GEF VI Sustainable Cities Integrated Approach Pilot (IAP-PROGRAM). Although this project is not formally part of that IAP, the initial design was informed by several of tools and platforms to be piloted under the Sustainable Cities IAP and the project is expected to closely collaborate with knowledge management activities and Global Knowledge Sharing platforms developed by the World Bank Group (WBG) as Lead Implementing Agency of the GEF Sustainable Cities IAP program. The PPG phase will include an analysis of the latest Sustainable City IAP tools and how they can be applied to this project, as well as elaborate how the project will interact with the Sustainable City IAP global knowledge sharing platforms.
  • Completion of the GEF Climate Change Mitigation tracking tool together with a detailed analysis of the project’s direct and indirect contribution to the stated Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction targets. The emission reduction calculations for the briquetting technologies will be further analyzed in detail during the PPG phase depending on the choice of machines and data collection at the targeted sites (these will be presented at CEO Endorsement); and
  • Stakeholder consultations during technical review:The PPG consultants will mobilize and engage stakeholders during the project design and document these consultations in detail. A PPG inception workshop will be held with all relevant stakeholders at the start of the PPG process.

Component B: Institutional arrangements, monitoring and evaluation

The outputs of Component A will be used as technical input to Component B for the formulation of the UNDP-GEF project document. 

  • Finalization of project results framework:Further define the results framework with appropriate objective-level and outcome-level quantitative and qualitative SMART2 indicators, and end-of-project targets.  Special attention will be made to include socio-economic and sex disaggregated indicators, as well as indicators in line with the relevant UNDP Strategic Plan IRRF outcome.
  • Definition of monitoring and evaluation (M&E):A detailed M&E work plan will be developed, including clear identification of responsibilities and accountabilities, as well as an appropriate M&E budget. The plan will be based on the standard template provided in the UNDP-GEF project document template that reflects the mandatory requirements of the GEF M&E Policy.
  • Define sustainability plan:The sustainability plan will outline the principles and guidelines for ensuring the long-term sustainability of project achievements. It will also outline an exit strategy, seeking the continuation of key activities/achievements without the need of long-term international financing.
  • Definition of management arrangements:The organisational structure governing the project will be decided.This will include identification of the project board.
  • Stakeholder consultations during Component B:Involve key agencies in the development of the project strategy to ensure a strong national ownership. In close collaboration with key government, representatives and other stakeholders ensure full participation in the development of the project results framework and ensure agreement on the project objectives and outcomes.Undertake consultations to secure agreement(s) on project implementation arrangements, including roles, responsibilities, and accountabilities of lead and partner agencies and (if applicable) responsible parties.Document these consultations.

Component C: Financial planning and co-financing investments

  • Prepare a detailed multi-year budget following the standard template provided in the UNDP-GEF project document template that reflects the mandatory requirements of the GEF M&E Policy.
  • Explore multilateral and bilateral co-financing opportunities: Undertake series of consultations with partners to ensure a coherent and sustainable financing package for the project including post- GEF grant phase.
  • Ensure completion of required official endorsement letters: A co-financing guarantee will be collected from participating government institutions, bilateral development partners, multilateral development partners and NGOs who wish to provide cash or in kind contributions to the project.
  • Ensure linkage and harmonization of the project with the relevant frameworks and indicators of the UNDP Strategic Plan (2014-2017).
  • As discussed in Section 5 of the PIF, there are several initiatives that have been earmarked in the National Energy Efficiency Action Plan (NEEAP), and with which the proposed project will coordinate its activities. The consultant will need to ensure that the project is harmonized with the initiatives mentioned in the PIF and other related programmes.
  • Stakeholder consultations during Component C:Mobilize and engage stakeholders during project design. Negotiate co-financing with organizations carrying out projects of relevance both in the targeted area and nationally.

Component D: Finalization and Validation workshop

A validation workshop will gather representatives from all relevant stakeholders to present, discuss and validate the final draft project document.

  • A validation workshop – facilitated by Greater Amman Municipality and UNDP – will be held in Jordan no later than March 2017 to gather representatives from all relevant stakeholders to present discuss and validate the final draft project documents and all materials developed by the consultants.
  • Following this workshop, the international consultant – with strong support from the national consultant – will move as quickly as possible to finalize the complete package of documentation for clearance internally by UNDP for submission to the GEF Secretariat. Once GEF Secretariat comments have been received, the international consultant (with support from the national consultant) will prepare a ‘UNDP Response to GEF Secretariat Comments’ and then make changes to the text of the UNDP project document and GEF Request for CEO Endorsement with the ultimate objective of obtaining GEF approval of the full project.
  • The complete documentation package to be submitted by PPG consultants’ team should include the following documents:
  • Finalized UNDP Project Document with all relevant annexes (using specified template)
  • Finalized GEF Request for CEO Endorsement
  • Finalized GEF CCM Tracking Tool
  • Finalized SESP (Social Environmental Screening Procedures)
  • All co-financing letters including official endorsement letter from GEF Operational Focal Point.

To finalize the documentation, the team of consultants, led by the international consultant, needs to take into account comments and feedback received from the following stakeholders

  • Key stakeholders in Jordan (Government, Private Sector, NGOs)
  • UNDP Jordan
  • UNDP/GEF Regional Service Center and UNDP/GEF HQ (New York)
  • GEF Secretariat and STAP

Component D should see the complete documentation package being formally approved by the GEF Secretariat.

Deliverables

In approximately 10 weeks of total work throughout the duration of the PPG process (various tasks are expected to be done concurrently), the overall purpose of the consultancy is the preparation of a UNDP/GEF compliant medium-sized project submission. The International Lead Expert for the Preparation of the Project Document is expected to:

Serve as team leader for other PPG consultant(s) and be responsible for the timely drafting of the required documents for submission to the GEF strictly adhering to the deadlines agreed to and ensuring quality control.

More specifically, the consultant will produce, with support from the national consultants, the following documents:

– Finalized UNDP Project Document with all annexes

– Finalized GEF Request for CEO Endorsement

– Finalized GEF CCM Tracking Tool

– Finalized ESSP (Environmental and Social Screening Procedures

– All co-financing letters including official endorsement letter from GEF Operational Focal Point.

Key project drafting tasks will be accomplished under the guidance and technical clearance of the UNDP/GEF regional service center (particularly the UNDP/GEF regional technical advisor for Energy, Infrastructure, Technology and Transport) and the UNDP Jordan Country Office, working in close collaboration with key government officials, donors, NGOs and the private sector. An early draft of the required submission documents will be submitted to the UNDP Country Office and UNDP/GEF technical staff at a date agreed at the inception workshop.

  • Play a pivotal role in developing a work plan and coordinating the input and outputs of all consultants and sub-contractors (where applicable), overseeing quality.

  • Finalize the project results framework:Further define the results framework with appropriate objective-level and outcome-level quantitative and qualitative SMART2 indicators, and end-of-project targets.Special attention will be made to include socio-economic and sex disaggregated indicators.

  • Develop a detailed M&E work plan, including clear identification of responsibilities and accountabilities, as well as an appropriate M&E budget. The plan will be based on the standard template provided in the UNDP-GEF project document template that reflects the mandatory requirements of the GEF M&E Policy.

  • Define a sustainability plan which will outline the principles and guidelines for ensuring the long-term sustainability of project achievements. It will also outline an exit strategy, seeking the continuation of key activities/achievements without the need of long-term international financing.

  • Lead on the development and analysis (financial viability and fiduciary oversight standards as per GEF guidelines) of the proposed use of GEF funds for capital investments in the proposed assets.

  • Lead the identification of climate change risks associated with the project implementation and  address any opportunities/risks identified during the initial environmental and social screening of the project proposal at PIF stage

  • Plan all activities of the project.

  • Define the logical framework (including all outcomes and outputs) and work plan for the project.

  • Clarify the additionality of the proposed outcomes and activities, and ensure that the project approach is the most cost-effective according to GEF guidelines.

  • Complete the GEF Climate Change Mitigation tracking tool together with a detailed analysis of the project’s direct and indirect contribution to the stated GHG emission reduction targets (based on local data collected by the national consultant).

  • Propose institutional and implementation arrangements consistent with a GEF Full-Sized project and in synergy with already existing arrangements for other UNDP/GEF projects in the country

  • Address all comments on the project design by the Scientific and Technical Advisory Panel and GEFSEC staff in the GEF review sheet

  • Facilitate the process of confirming the co-funding and co-financing plan.

  • Facilitate consultations with all relevant stakeholders with regards to the proposal, including detailed budget, detailed TORs for all project staff, and a detailed activity and work plan, in line with GEF eligibility principles.

 
Competencies
  • Demonstrates integrity by modeling the UN’s values and ethical standards;

  • Promotes the vision, mission and strategic goals of UN/UNDP;

  • Displays cultural, gender, religion, race, nationality and age sensitivity and adaptability;

  • Ability to lead strategic planning, results-based management and reporting;

  • Builds strong relationships with clients, focuses on impact and result for the client and responds positively to feedback;

  • Consistently approaches work with energy and a positive, constructive attitude;

  • Demonstrates good oral and written communication skills;

  • Demonstrates ability to manage complexities and work under pressure, as well as conflict resolution.

 
Required Skills and Experience

Interested individual consultants or consulting companies should possess the relevant experience in design and implementation of resource efficient (energy and water) technologies in urban contexts as well as the ability to collect verify and analyze energy information and market data; analyze and calculate GHG emission reductions; and prepare detailed donor-compliant documents and templates.  The minimum key expertise of the consultant shall cover the following:

  • Proven experience in EE technologies, preferably with regards to buildings and streetlights.
  • Past experience in GEF project formulation/design, including drafting of GEF-compliant project documents and endorsement requests, is preferred.
  • Minimum postgraduate degree related to climate mitigation, sustainable energy, urbanization, environmental management or relevant disciplines. A relevant university degree in combination with qualifying experience in the project design, monitoring and management may be accepted in lieu of the advanced university degree.
  • At least 10 years’ experience designing and/or implementing renewable energy and/or climate mitigation activities in developing countries.
  • Ability to conduct detailed quantitative GHG emission reduction calculations (direct and indirect) according to GEF policies and procedures.
  • Ability to conduct research and analysis with strong synthesis skills.
  • Ability to build strong relationships with national consultants; focuses on impact and results for the client and responds positively to critical feedback; consensus-oriented.
  • Highly developed inter-personal, negotiation and teamwork skills, networking aptitude.
  • Regional and national knowledge of Jordan or MENA region is highly desirable.
  • Excellent English drafting and communication skills
  • Experience working with international organizations, including UNDP, is preferred but not required.

Documents to be included when submitting the proposals

Interested individual consultants must submit the following documents/information to demonstrate their qualifications:

1. Proposal:

(i) Explaining why they are the most suitable for the work

(ii) Provide a brief methodology on how they will approach and conduct the work.

2. Financial proposal

3. Personal CV including past experience in similar projects and at least 3 references

Financial Proposal 

Lump sum contracts

The financial proposal shall specify a total lump sum amount including fees, travel cost (2 round tickets for Amman), DSA for 2 missions (for 2 calendar weeks (each missions) in Amman), while local transportations (local travel means inside Jordan) will be covered by the UNDP. Payments are based upon output, i.e. upon delivery of the services specified in the TOR.  In order to assist the requesting unit in the comparison of financial proposals, the financial proposal will include a breakdown of this lump sum amount.  

Individual consultants will be evaluated based on the following methodologies:

 Cumulative analysis

When using this weighted scoring method, the award of the contract should be made to the individual consultant whose offer has been evaluated and determined as:

a) responsive/compliant/acceptable, and

b) Having received the highest score out of a pre-determined set of weighted technical and financial criteria specific to the solicitation.

* Technical Criteria weight; 70%

* Financial Criteria weight; 30%

Only candidates obtaining a minimum of 50 point would be considered for the Financial Evaluation.

UNDP  is an employer committed to gender equity and to providing equal opportunities to both males and females.

Fund code: 62000

 


POSITION TYPE

ORGANIZATION TYPE

EXPERIENCE-LEVEL

DEGREE REQUIRED