Dryland Recharge Assessment in Morocco (DReAM)

University of Kentucky

Marrakech, Morocco 🇲🇦

Award Title

Collaborative Research (IRES Track I): A Multi-Faceted Approach for Understanding Hydrologic Controls on Transmission Losses in Dryland Environments

Overview

Drylands cover nearly 1/3 of Earth’s surface, host 40% of its population, and are mainly located in developing countries. Groundwater recharge in drylands is dominated by focused mechanisms, such as infiltration beneath ephemeral streams, but is incompletely understood.

We are recruiting 5 graduate or undergraduate students for a National Science Foundation-funded project (International Research Experiences for Students) to study transmission losses in ephemeral streams in Morocco. The program includes (dates are tentative):

• Virtual training in techniques in hydrology, remote sensing, GIS, and hydrologic modeling (online, March 15–April 30)

• 1-week virtual technical and cultural training workshop (online, May 15–22)

• 5-week field project with U.S. and Moroccan researchers in Morocco (May 30–July 2)

• Virtual training in professional practice, scientific communication, and community outreach (online, August 15–December 15)

Travel expenses will be covered and a $3,000 stipend will be paid upon completion.

Eligibility Requirements

Ideal applicants will have a background in geology or a related discipline (for example, agricultural engineering, civil engineering, environmental engineering, environmental science, geography, or soil science). Previous coursework in hydrology, hydrogeology, remote sensing, or GIS and previous research experience are helpful but not mandatory. The ability to work in teams and openness to different cultures are advantages. Members of underrepresented groups are particularly encouraged to apply.

Locations

Faculte des Sciences Semlalia
Marrakech, MOROCCO
Boulevard Prince Moulay Abdellah
Marrakech, Marrakech-Safi 40000
MOROCCO


POSITION TYPE

ORGANIZATION TYPE

EXPERIENCE-LEVEL

IHE Delft MSc in Water and Sustainable Development